Learn the Italian Alphabet

By optilingo

Learn the Italian alphabet and perfect your Italian accent with the right Italian pronunciation.

Summary of the Italian Alphabet

Letter

Name

Pronounced as

А а

a

Short a – like father

В в

bi

B – like bee

C c

ci

Ch when before e or i – like charge

Silent when with sci or sce

Hard k for all other instances – like cart

D d

di

D – like day

E e

e

Close e – like melting

Open e – like pen

F f

effe

F – like fog

G g

gi

J when before e or i – like June

Spanish ñ when before n

Soft y when before li and a second vowel – like yes

Hard g in remaining cases – like goat

H h

acca

Silent

I i

i

short i – like marine

Silent when after sc, gl, g, or c and another vowel

L l

elle

L – like lost

Silent when a g appears first and a vowel after

M m

emme

M – like mine

N n

enne

N – like none

O o

o

Close o – like cozy

Open short a – like all

P p

pi

P – like post

Q q

cu

K – like kin

R r

erre

Rolled r (similar to the Spanish rolled r)

S s

esse

Unvoiced s when used at the beginning of a word followed by a vowel, or when it is followed by the consonants c, q, f, p, t or another s, or when it follows any consonant  – like schools

Hard s after any other consonant, or between two vowels, like rose

Sh when before ci or ce, like sheet

T t

ti

T – like ton

U u

u

Oo, like moon, but short sound

W when before a vowel, like well

V v

vi/vu

V – like voice

Z z

zeta

Z, like zero

Ts sound, like pizza

Voiced and Unvoiced Consonants

Understanding grammar will help you on your way to foreign language fluency. When learning the Italian language, a great place to start is with the alphabet. While there are many similarities with the English alphabet, there ar many you should be aware of to help your rapidly develop fluency in the Italian [OptiLingo’s Online Italian Course Is Quick and Easy].

Within the Italian language, s and z may be voiced or unvoiced. The difference here is also simple: voiced consonants are made by vibrating your vocal chords, while unvoiced consonants do not require any such vibration. An unvoiced “s” is pronounced like “mouse;” a voiced s is pronounced like “dozen”. An unvoiced “z” is pronounced like “pizza;” a voiced “z” is pronounced like “ds” like “pads”.